National Poetry Writing Month: Day #26 (April 26, 2014)

Today’s entry inadvertently combines prompts from PoeWar:

Write a poem about a natural event.

Writer’s Digest:

[W]rite a water poem.

and NaPoWriMo.net:

…give the curtal sonnet a whirl.

Earlier, the prompt explains:

…the curtal sonnet is shorter than the normal, fourteen-line sonnet. Instead, it has a first stanza of six lines, followed by a second stanza of four, and then closes with a half-line.

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National Poetry Writing Month: Day #25 (April 25, 2014)

Today’s entry combines prompts from PoeWar:

Write a poem that uses every letter of the alphabet at least once.

Writer’s Digest:

[W]rite a ‘last straw’ poem.

and NaPoWriMo.net:

[W]rite a poem that uses anaphora.

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National Poetry Writing Month: Day #24 (April 24, 2014)

Today’s entry combines prompts from Kelli Russell Agodon‘s list:

Write a poem that has the word ‘love’ in it somewhere. You cannot use the word ‘love’ by itself; it must be hidden (such as in the word ‘glove’, or in two words, like ‘halo venom’.

PoeWar:

Write a poem that begins with the word ‘I‘. [Never a problem for me, it seems]

and NaPoWriMo.net:

[W]rite a poem that features walls, bricks, stones, arches, or the like.

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National Poetry Writing Month: Day #23 (April 23, 2014)

Today’s prompt is from Kelli Russell Agodon’s list:

Write a poem where the last word of the first line begins with the first letter of your name, and the last word of the second line begins with the second letter of your name [—] until you have spelled out your first name and/or last name.

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National Poetry Writing Month: Day #22 (April 22, 2014)

Today’s entry combines a prompt from Kelli Russell Agodon‘s list:

Write a poem that only has five syllables in each line. Give the poem a long title.

with a prompt from PoeWar‘s list:

Write a poem in which a similar or identical phrase is repeated three or more times throughout the poem.

 

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National Poetry Writing Month: Day #21 (April 21, 2014)

For today’s entry, I went with one of the prompts from Kelli Russell Agodon‘s list:

Write a poem with the opposite hand that you write with, or, if you type your poems on the computer, use only one hand to type.

Then I applied one of the random prompts on Language is a Virus:

Systematically derange the language: Write a work consisting only of prepositional phrases, or add a gerund to every line of an already existing work.

I then chose the bits that worked from the two versions, and combined them into today’s poem.

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